Category: navy

Ah, tooth pain is it madam?

Ah, tooth pain is it madam?

Our First Event Of the Season

Our First Event Of the Season: undefined

Well, it’s been a long time since I&rsqu…

Well, it’s been a long time since I’ve posted but that doesn’t mean I haven’t been busy! Amongst other projects, here is a 1790’s Royal Navy midshipman’s coat I have made.

Just finished up a couple pairs of sailors ski…

Just finished up a couple pairs of sailors skilts.

These are workwear items, to be worn over the top of your more expensive breeches, hence the baggy legs.

There’s actually 54" of fabric pleated into a 28-30 inch waist! I’ve done another pair in 38-40".

First event of the year coming up at Greenwich, London. Very excited!

Today I’ve been doing a bit of rope spli…

Today I’ve been doing a bit of rope splicing and knot tying.

I’m making the clews and nettles for an 18th century naval hammock.

Each of the lines will fasten to an eye in the canvass hammock.

The design went virtually unchanged, well into the 20th century.

Europeans observed the Arowak Indians sleeping in hammocks and quickly adapted the practice for use aboard ships. Prior to this, sailors would sleep on the deck or in cots which made them prone to injury in rough seas. It took a while to become accustomed to sleeping on a hammock but once you’re used to it, it’s virtually impossible to fall out.

The design of the clews means that the hammock canvass wraps around the sleeping sailor, preventing him from falling out. However, it was a popular joke among sailors to cut or loosen the ropes, spilling the sailor out in the middle of the night. He’d reach out for his neighbours hammock to break his fall, which would set off a chain reaction of sailors falling onto the deck.